Geluid

Alles met betrekking tot vrij energie tref je hier aan.
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baphomet
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Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 16:08

vr 21 mar 2014, 21:45

Ik weet niet helemaal of dit nieuwe topic hier helemaal op z'n plaats is in het vrije energie forum, maar desalniettemin wil ik het toch even over iets hebben. iets dat ik eigenlijk vanmorgen al op het spoor kwam nadat NoMore ergens iets poste over een Afrikaans volk dat ruim 200.000 jaar geleden leefde in Zuid Afrika. Dit volk delfde naar goud en waren behoorlijk geciviliseerd en ontwikkeld. Enfin, in dat filmpje van NoMore dat hij elders op QFF poste kwam iets voor over geluid en dat geluid sneller zou zijn het licht en daarnaast hadden ze het in dat filmpje over een oude man die met geluid water liet koken.

Afbeelding

U snapt dat mijn interesse toen gewekt was, en omdat er nog geen draadje / topic over puur en alleen maar geluid en de mogelijkheden van geluid was, leek me het dus een prachtige aanleiding om eens in de digitale schrijfpen te klimmen en er eens een topic over aan te maken alwaar we voortaan alles over de mogelijkheden van geluid kunnen bespreken.

Nu eerst weer even terug naar de man die later met geluid laat koken:


Inventor and saxophone player Peter Davey has come up with a device that he claims boils water in no time.

He calls it the "sonic boiler" because he claims it uses the power of sound. How the heater actually works has confounded experts.

The device looks oddly like a bent desk lamp, with a metallic ball at the end instead of a lightbulb. When plugged into the power supply, and the ball is lowered into water, it boils the liquid within seconds -- even as little as a tablespoonful.

"Everybody boils twice the amount of water they need so I decided I would find a way to boil water and make steam more economically," said Davey, a former Spitfire pilot.

"This boils exactly what you want to drink."


Afbeelding

Afbeelding
Davey, who lives in a tumbledown two-storey historic homestead called Locksley in Dallington, has been using the boiler to make hot drinks for 30 years.

He said he first came up with the concept 50 years ago and it took him half of those years to figure out how to make the device.

"The principle is beautiful. I have cashed in on a natural phenomenon and it's all about music," he said.

"If I hadn't been playing the saxophone, I probably wouldn't have come up with the idea."

Davey noticed as he played the saxophone at home that everything resonated at a different frequency.

"The glasses will tinkle on one note. Knives and forks in the drawer will tinkle on another note and I realised that everything has its point of vibration," he said. "In the same way, a component in the ball is tuned to a certain frequency."

Davey said it took years of trial and error to get the device to where it is now. He has made a number of prototypes using the same principle, including a steamer.

Friends dropping by over the years have urged Davey to make them a sonic boiler and that got him thinking commercially.

Davey, who turns 92 today, is now looking for a manufacturer who will buy the technology and make the devices for the mass market.

"Nowadays, with the economy of water and electricity, I think it could be even more important than when I conceived the idea," he said. "They could sell a million of the things in China."

Davey estimated boilers could be made as cheaply as $9 each. He could imagine cafes using them as a gimmick to make express tea and coffee.

"I cannot wait to explain the principle to somebody who wants to take it on," he said.

The Press invited a retired Canterbury University engineer, Professor Arthur Williamson, to look at the boiler and he was stumped.

He watched Davey boil various quantities of water, took notes of the energy used and temperatures reached. He left scratching his head.

"I don't know enough about sound to know whether you can transfer that amount of energy via soundwaves. I doubt it," said Williamson.

He did remember an alternative kettle years ago that had two perforated metal plates inside. The power ran between the plates, through the water. "The resistance through the water provided the load. I wonder if it isn't working like that? Without taking it to bits, you can't tell."

The kettle was specially designed to prevent people getting a shock from touching the boiling water.

Williamson's verdict of the sonic boiler? "It is an interesting gimmick, irrespective of how it works. I would probably buy one as a gimmick. I think more homework needs to be done."

Also queuing up for a boiler, after first seeing one in the 1960s, is Stu Buchanan, leader of the Garden City Big Band and a friend of Davey.

"It's rather spectacular. I don't know why it has never taken off as a utensil for people. I think it's a class act," said Buchanan.






Davey was born in Hamilton in 1916. During World War 2 he flew Spitfires for the 602 City of Glasgow Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force. The squadron operated along the south coast of England, escorting bombers to Holland and Belgium, doing convoy patrols and fighter sweeps into France.

After the war's end he married and had two children. He bought Locksley in 1964. Davey shares the top storey of the homestead with his 55-year-old son, also called Peter, and a grey tabby cat called Santa. The ground floor is let to lodgers who help pay the bills.



Video @ or http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid ... 6120&hl=en http://multimedia.stuff.co.nz/thepress/sonic/





From MerLib @ http://merlib.org/node/5504



sonicboiler2.jpg“The design of the Davey’s sonic heater is extremely simple. It actually is composed of two major parts only – see Figure K8 (3) from monograph [1/4]. The most important out of these two parts is a resonating hemispherical bowl (1) made of a sound inducing metal plate. The second part is a buffering hemispherical bowl (2) almost identical in shape to the bowl (1). This second bowl has the radius around 4 mm larger than the resonating hemispherical bowl (1).

Both bowls are assembled symmetrically one around the other, meaning the hemispherical bowl (1) is placed inside of the hemispherical bowl (2). Coin is 32 mm wide = 1.25984 inches / Big bowl approximately 1.75 inches wide and .75 inches thick / Small bowl approximately 1 3/8 inches wide. Of course, apart from these two bowls, the heater also includes a long rod, nuts, washers, and electrical wires. These are to hold it together, to supply electricity to both bowls, and to allow the heater to be submerged into water that it heats. But these other parts are marginal additions only.

The major parts are the bowls. During experimental production of this heater, the resonating hemispherical bowl (1) usually is made from an old cover for a bicycle bell. The dimensions of this hemispherical bowl are not important. It is only vital that it falls into a sonic resonance at the frequency of 50 Hertz, and that it has the outer surface which is parallel and equidistant from the external buffering hemispherical bowl (2). To each of these two bowls a different wire of the household electricity supply (i.e. 220 V, 50 Hz) is connected. The heater must be submerged in water that it heat. It brings water to the boiling point extremely fast.”


Via http://keelynet.wordpress.com/2008/02/0 ... ic-boiler/




Anyways geluid, daar kun je dus veel mee doen, dat wisten we op QFF hier eigenlijk ook wel, maar dat geluid ook wetenschappelijk gezien sneller dan het licht was, dat was nieuw voor mij persoonlijk...
Sound Pulses Exceed Speed of Light



A group of high school and college teachers and students has transmitted sound pulses faster than light travels—at least according to one understanding of the speed of light.

The results conform to Einstein's theory of relativity, so don't expect this research to lead to sound-propelled spaceships that fly faster than light. Still, the work could help spur research that boosts the speed of electrical and other signals higher than before.

The standard metric for the speed of light is that of light traveling in vacuum. This constant, known as c, is roughly 186,000 miles per second, or roughly one million times the speed of sound in air. According to Einstein's work, matter and signals cannot travel faster than c.

PVC science

However, physicist William Robertson at Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, along with a high school teacher, two college students and two high school students, managed to, depending on how you look at it, transmit sound pulses faster than c using little more than a plastic plumbing pipe and a computer's sound card.

"This experiment is truly basement science," Robertson told LiveScience.

The key to understanding their results, reported online Jan. 2 in the journal Applied Physics Letters, is envisioning every pulse of sound or light as a group of intermingled waves. This pulse rises and falls with energy over space, with a peak of strength in the middle.

Robertson and his colleagues transmitted sound pulses from the sound card through a loop made from PVC plumbing pipe and connectors from a hardware store. This loop split up and then recombined the tiny waves making up each pulse.

This led to a curious result. When looking at a pulse that entered and then exited the pipe, before the peak of the entering pulse even got into the pipe, the peak of the exiting pulse had already left the pipe.

If the velocities of each of the waves making up a sound pulse in this setup are taken together, the "group velocity" of the pulse exceeded c.

"I believe that this is the first experimental demonstration of sound going faster than light," Robertson said. Past research has proven it possible to transmit electrical and even light pulses with group velocities exceeding c.

Common thing?

Robertson explained this faster-than-light acoustic effect is likely commonplace but imperceptible.

"The loop filter that we used splits and then recombines sound along two unequal length paths," he said. "Such 'split-path' interference occurs frequently in the everyday world."

For example: "When a sound source is located near a hard wall, some sound reaches the listener directly from the source whereas some sound travels the longer path that bounces the sound off the wall. The sounds recombine at the listener," Robertson said. However, the weakness of the signals and the fact that any resultant differences in timing are very slight "mean that we would never be able to hear this effect."

None of the individual waves making up the sound pulses traveled faster than c. In other words, Einstein's theory of relativity was preserved. This means one could not, for instance, shout a message faster than light.

Still, this research might have engineering applications. Robertson explained that although it is not possible to send information faster than light, it seems these techniques could make it possible to route slower-than-light signals in electronic circuits faster than before.
Bron: ->> http://www.livescience.com/1212-sound-p ... light.html

Kortom, met geluid kun je dus zoals ik net ook al zei, veel meer dan de meeste mensen denken...

Wat te denken van zaken laten zweven...



Akoestische levitatie zeg maar...

Geluid, erg interessante materie en daarom dus aandacht voor geluid in dit nieuwe draadje...

:)
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: blackbox, fr3bzy, BL@DE, Mec, NoMore
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baphomet
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Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 16:08

vr 21 mar 2014, 22:21

Vanaf nu dus een mooie vergaarbak voor alles met betrekking tot de mogelijkheden van geluid...

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baphomet
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Berichten: 23147
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 16:08

vr 21 mar 2014, 22:21

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baphomet
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Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 16:08

vr 21 mar 2014, 22:32

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