The Retarded States of America

Politiek en oorlog zijn onlosmakelijk met elkaar verbonden en alles over politiek en oorlog kun je hier terugvinden.
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

wo 20 mar 2013, 22:17

:stikkie:

A Putnam County assemblyman received a ticket for marijuana possession Thursday after he was stopped for speeding on the New York State Thruway.

Assemblyman Steve Katz, a 59-year-old Republican who voted no last year on a bill to legalize medical marijuana, had been traveling 80 mph on I-87 through Coeymans, N.Y., where the speed limit is 65 mph, state police said. During the speeding stop, police said a trooper noted the odor of marijuana and found Mr. Katz in possession of a small bag.

State police released Mr. Katz with a ticket and ordered him to appear in court on March 28. He didn’t immediately return a call for comment.

This is not Mr. Katz’s first brush with the law. A veterinarian by training, he revealed last year that he had two prior arrests for illegally dumping the body of a dead dog and an alleged attack on a dog in his care. Both cases were ultimately dismissed.

meer hier: http://blogs.wsj.com/metropolis/2013/03 ... possesion/
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

ma 15 apr 2013, 12:10

TheAlexJonesChannel


Drinking And Walking Is The New Crime.

Gepubliceerd op 13 apr 2013

The police department is now saying they will arrest you for drinking and walking in Austin Texas. We live in such a free country.
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
Tobi
Super QFF-er
Super QFF-er
Berichten: 1855
Lid geworden op: wo 21 aug 2013, 18:13

vr 19 apr 2013, 01:48

Is schijnbaar geen guantanamo topic oid.. dus kdrop t hier maar.

Moraliteit ∝ Vrijheid
Real eyes realize real lies!!
Natural Law: The REAL law of attraction | The end of all evil
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

vr 19 apr 2013, 13:32

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nu-GvPxlN84

Doctors of the Dark Side

At the center of the debate about the U.S. torture program, Zero Dark Thirty and the role of American doctors is the new and explosive feature documentary DOCTORS OF THE DARK SIDE!

“When people committed these same acts, we prosecuted them in the past in places like Nuremberg” – Nathaniel Raymond, Physicians for Human Rights

“If producing some pain does the most good for the most people, it’s entirely ethical” – U.S. Military Psychologist

DOCTORS OF THE DARK SIDE is an acclaimed feature-length documentary that explosively depicts the scandal of how American physicians and psychologists facilitated the torture of detainees in U.S.-controlled military prisons and installations.

http://shelterisland.net/movies/doctors ... dark-side/


==============================================================


Constitution Project Report on Detainee Treatment Concludes U.S. Engaged in Torture

By Ritika Singh
Tuesday, April 16, 2013 at 1:15 PM

The Constitution Project has released the results of its Task Force on Detainee Treatment in the form of this 577-page report—which concludes that “it is indisputable that the United States engaged in the practice of torture” and that “the nation’s highest officials bear some responsibility for allowing and contributing to the spread of torture.” Here is Scott Shane of the New York Times with the story.

Here is the Table of Contents, and the Statement of the Task Force is below the fold.

http://www.lawfareblog.com/2013/04/cons ... n-torture/
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
Mec
Super QFF-er
Super QFF-er
Berichten: 1518
Lid geworden op: vr 17 dec 2010, 19:44

vr 19 apr 2013, 23:44

Achterlijk Holland

Afbeelding

:P
My Jekyll doesn't Hide
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

zo 05 mei 2013, 16:59

Amerikaanse tiener opgepakt na uit de hand gelopen wetenschapsproject
Paulusie

05-05-13
http://www.waarmaarraar.nl/pages/re/796 ... oject.html


Een tiener uit Florida met een blanco strafblad riskeert een federale tenlastelegging na het uitvoeren van wat een klasgenoot "een uit de hand gelopen wetenschapsproject" noemt. De 16-jarige Kiera Wilmot is beschuldigd wegens het mengen van huishoudchemicaliën in een waterflesje op haar school, de Bartow High School. Dat zorgde ervoor dat de dop van het flesje schoot en veroorzaakte ook een beetje rook. Het experiment werd buiten uitgevoerd, er was geen schade en niemand raakte gewond.

Kort na Wilmots experiment arresteerden autoriteiten haar en beschuldigden ze haar van "het bezit en het gebruiken van een wapen op grondgebied van een school en het lossen van een schadelijk middel", volgens WTSP-TV. Het schooldistrict stuurde Wilmot daarop weg van de school wegens het gebruiken van "een gevaarlijk wapen", meer bepaald een waterflesje. Ze zal haar middelbare studies via een uitwijzingsprogramma afmaken.

Vrienden en stafleden, onder wie de schooldirecteur, verdedigen Wilmot, en zeggen aan de media dat de autoriteiten een eerlijke student gearresteerd hebben die geen kwaad bedoelde. "Het is een goed meisje", zei directeur Ron Richard aan WTSP-TV. "Ze zat voor dit incident nog nooit in de problemen." "Ze wou gewoon zien wat er gebeurde met die chemicaliën in het flesje", zei een klasgenoot. "Kijk wat er nu is gebeurd." Het schooldistrict Polk County Schools blijft bij zijn beslissing om Wilmot weg te sturen, verklaarde dat "er gevolgen zijn aan acties", en noemde Wilmots experiment "een ernstige overschrijding van de regels".

bron: Skynet
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

wo 15 mei 2013, 12:44

Guantánamo Is Not an Anomaly — Prisoners in the US Are Force-Fed Every Day
by Ann Neumann

Published on Monday, May 6, 2013
https://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/05/06-0


I know a hunger-striking prisoner who hasn’t eaten solid food in more than five years. He is being force-fed by the medical staff where he’s incarcerated. Starving himself, he told me during one of our biweekly phone calls last year, is the only way he has to exercise his first amendment rights and to protest his conviction. Not eating is his only available free speech act.

The prisoner has lost half his body weight and four teeth to malnutrition. He and his lawyer have gone to court to stop the force-feedings, but a judge ruled against him in March. If I asked you to guess where Coleman is being held, you’d likely say Guantánamo — “America’s offshore war-on-terror camp” — where a mass hunger strike of 100 prisoners has brought the ethics of force-feeding to American newspapers, if not American consciences. Twenty-five of those prisoners are now being manually fed with tubes.

But William Coleman is not at Guantánamo. He’s in Connecticut. The prison medical staff force-feeding him are on contract from the University of Connecticut, not the U.S. Navy. Guantánamo is not an anomaly. Prisoners — who are on U.S. soil and not an inaccessible island military base — are routinely and systematically force-fed every day.

The accounts of force-feeding coming out of Guantánamo, including Samir Naji al Hasan Moqbel’s “Gitmo is Killing Me” in The New York Times two weeks ago, are consistent with how Coleman has described the process to me — and to the Supreme Court of Connecticut.

On Oct. 23, 2008, medical staff and corrections officers first strapped Coleman at four points to a vinyl medical table and snaked a rubber tube up his nose, down his throat and into his stomach. When the tube kinked, they thought his reaction to the pain was resistance and tied him across the chest with mesh straps. They reinserted the tube and Coleman gagged as they drained Ensure, a nutrient drink, into it. He continued to gag. He bled. He vomited. He felt violated, not medically treated. Coleman is still being force-fed; sometimes the staff put a semi-permanent tube up his nose, sometimes they don’t. They no longer strap him down. He knows the staff. They are, he says, following orders.

The fact that force feedings are being discussed in the context of Guantánamo is dangerously misleading; it obscures the routine use of feeding tubes in American prisons. Other recent feeding tube cases have taken place in Washington state, Utah, Illinois and Wisconsin — all prisoners who had the resources to contest their treatment in court. No sweeping study of force-feeding has been done, so statistics on usage don’t exist. Only three states have laws against force-feeding prisoners: Florida, Georgia and California, where a hunger strike in 2011 at a facility in Pelican Bay effectively caused a court examination of prison conditions. Just this week Leroy Dorsey, who sued New York state to have his force-feedings stopped, lost his case. “Force-feeding order did not violate inmate’s rights,” the Reuters headline reads.

No matter where force-feedings take place, whether in Guantánamo or Connecticut, they are considered torture by most of the world’s medical and governing bodies. As U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Rupert Coville said this week about tube usage, “If it’s perceived as torture or inhuman treatment — and it’s the case, it’s painful — then it is prohibited by international law.” At The Daily Beast, Kent Sepkowitz, a doctor, writes, “Without question, [force-feeding] is the most painful procedure doctors routinely inflict on conscious patients,” and calls it “barbaric.”

In 2005, when 142 Guantánamo detainees stopped eating, their subsequent force-feedings caused 263 international doctors to write an open letter in the medical journal The Lancet that denounced the practice and called on doctors to stop participating. They wrote, “Physicians do not have to agree with the prisoner, but they must respect their informed decision.”

To little effect, the American Medical Association condemned the force feedings in 2005, 2009 and again last week, saying that “every competent patient has the right to refuse medical intervention, including life-sustaining interventions.”

Yet most media outlets continue to portray feeding tube use as a “complex ethical debate.” It’s not. Competent prisoners go on hunger strike because they have something to say and no other way to say it. Prison officials choose not to hear — and silence them with tubes. In court documents, wardens cite two primary concerns: the health of the prisoner, whose well-being they are responsible for (and for whose “suicide” they could be blamed); and prison order, including disruption of facility routine, copycat hunger strikers, and low morale among corrections officers and staff.

According to Mara Silver, who wrote about prison hunger strikes for Stanford Law Review in 2005, there is scant evidence that hunger strikers disrupt prison order. In fact, she notes, wardens often aren’t required to show proof when challenged. Consistently, routinely, wardens are deferred to in these cases.

Last week The Chicago Tribune reported that President Obama, who has not yet fulfilled a campaign promise to close Guantánamo, had courts on his side:

Most U.S. judges who have examined forced feeding in prisons have concluded that the measure may violate the rights of inmates to control their own bodies and to privacy — rights rooted in the U.S. Constitution and in common law. But they have found that the needs of operating a prison are more important.

Prisoners’ rights activists have long acknowledged courts’ reluctance to reconsider application of common law and constitutional rights to those inside. This status quo works so long as it is supported by public opinion — or public ignorance of the practice.

Hunger strikes have the power to change public opinion. This might be why the warden of Coleman’s prison has refused my request for a visit — and that of any other journalist. As the warden put it in a brief letter, they think my presence might “exacerbate” the inmate’s condition or “contribute to his detriment.” Or, perhaps, bring attention to Coleman’s case. So long as force-feeding is considered an exceptional practice, applied to less than two dozen men from foreign countries, and on foreign soil, the public and the medical community can remain ignorant of the torture within our growing domestic prison industry.

For an article on William Coleman that appeared in Guernica magazine in January, I spoke with American bioethicist Jacob Appel, who has written extensively about Coleman and feeding-tube usage in U.S. prisons. The public discourse about Guantánamo, Appel told me, had falsely assumed that torture and abuse are an exception rather than the general rule. Guantánamo, he said, “was presented as … an extraordinary set of circumstances, not an outflow of American law.”

----------------------

Ann Neumann is editor of The Revealer, a publication of the Center for Religion and Media at New York University. She has written for Guernica magazine, The Nation and the New York Law Review, and has appeared on Voice of America, NY-1 News and WBAI. She teaches journalism at Drew University. Neumann blogs about religion and dying at otherspoon.blogspot.com. Follow her on Twitter at @otherspoon.
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
Mec
Super QFF-er
Super QFF-er
Berichten: 1518
Lid geworden op: vr 17 dec 2010, 19:44

vr 17 mei 2013, 00:19

My Jekyll doesn't Hide
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
Mec
Super QFF-er
Super QFF-er
Berichten: 1518
Lid geworden op: vr 17 dec 2010, 19:44

di 21 mei 2013, 01:55

My Jekyll doesn't Hide
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

di 21 mei 2013, 22:55

'Dwangvoeding bij hongerstakers mag'
Honger- en dorststakers kan onder bepaalde omstandigheden dwangvoeding worden gegeven.

21 mei 2013 21:42
http://www.nu.nl/politiek/3480107/dwang ... s-mag.html


Daartoe bieden het Europese Verdrag voor de Rechten van de Mens en nationale wettelijke voorschriften ruimte, zo schrijft de Raad van State in een advies, meldt het televisieprogramma Nieuwsuur dinsdag.

Het advies werd vorige week woensdag geschreven op verzoek van staatssecretaris van Veiligheid en Justitie Fred Teeven (VVD). De afgelopen tijd gingen vreemdelingen in een detentiecentrum in Rotterdam en het justitieel complex op Schiphol in honger- en dorststaking.

Nieuwsuur meldt verder op basis van mails van het ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie aan het Justitieel Medisch Centrum (JMC) in Scheveningen dat het ministerie meteen na het advies van de Raad van State op zoek ging naar een arts in het JMC die bereid zou zijn dwangvoeding toe te dienen als daar een medische noodzaak voor was. Verschillende honger- en dorststakers zijn naar het JMC gebracht toen hun gezondheid slechter werd.

Negen stakers
Nederland telt op dit moment negen hongerstakende vreemdelingen, meldt het ministerie van Veiligheid en Justitie. Er zijn er nu drie in Zeist, twee in Rotterdam, drie in Scheveningen en een in Vught. Deze laatste weigert volgens de zegsvrouw als enige ook vocht.

Teeven heeft de Raad van State recent om 'spoedvoorlichting' gevraagd over wat hij moet doen als de gezondheidssituatie nijpend wordt, bevestigde een woordvoerder van het adviesorgaan dinsdag al. Op de inhoud kon hij niet ingaan en ook het ministerie heeft de informatie nog niet vrijgegeven.

[quote=""combi" post=72351"]Guantánamo Is Not an Anomaly — Prisoners in the US Are Force-Fed Every Day
by Ann Neumann

Published on Monday, May 6, 2013
https://www.commondreams.org/view/2013/05/06-0


I know a hunger-striking prisoner who hasn’t eaten solid food in more than five years. He is being force-fed by the medical staff where he’s incarcerated. Starving himself, he told me during one of our biweekly phone calls last year, is the only way he has to exercise his first amendment rights and to protest his conviction. Not eating is his only available free speech act.

The prisoner has lost half his body weight and four teeth to malnutrition. He and his lawyer have gone to court to stop the force-feedings, but a judge ruled against him in March. If I asked you to guess where Coleman is being held, you’d likely say Guantánamo — “America’s offshore war-on-terror camp” — where a mass hunger strike of 100 prisoners has brought the ethics of force-feeding to American newspapers, if not American consciences. Twenty-five of those prisoners are now being manually fed with tubes.

But William Coleman is not at Guantánamo. He’s in Connecticut. The prison medical staff force-feeding him are on contract from the University of Connecticut, not the U.S. Navy. Guantánamo is not an anomaly. Prisoners — who are on U.S. soil and not an inaccessible island military base — are routinely and systematically force-fed every day.

The accounts of force-feeding coming out of Guantánamo, including Samir Naji al Hasan Moqbel’s “Gitmo is Killing Me” in The New York Times two weeks ago, are consistent with how Coleman has described the process to me — and to the Supreme Court of Connecticut.

On Oct. 23, 2008, medical staff and corrections officers first strapped Coleman at four points to a vinyl medical table and snaked a rubber tube up his nose, down his throat and into his stomach. When the tube kinked, they thought his reaction to the pain was resistance and tied him across the chest with mesh straps. They reinserted the tube and Coleman gagged as they drained Ensure, a nutrient drink, into it. He continued to gag. He bled. He vomited. He felt violated, not medically treated. Coleman is still being force-fed; sometimes the staff put a semi-permanent tube up his nose, sometimes they don’t. They no longer strap him down. He knows the staff. They are, he says, following orders.

The fact that force feedings are being discussed in the context of Guantánamo is dangerously misleading; it obscures the routine use of feeding tubes in American prisons. Other recent feeding tube cases have taken place in Washington state, Utah, Illinois and Wisconsin — all prisoners who had the resources to contest their treatment in court. No sweeping study of force-feeding has been done, so statistics on usage don’t exist. Only three states have laws against force-feeding prisoners: Florida, Georgia and California, where a hunger strike in 2011 at a facility in Pelican Bay effectively caused a court examination of prison conditions. Just this week Leroy Dorsey, who sued New York state to have his force-feedings stopped, lost his case. “Force-feeding order did not violate inmate’s rights,” the Reuters headline reads.

No matter where force-feedings take place, whether in Guantánamo or Connecticut, they are considered torture by most of the world’s medical and governing bodies. As U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Rupert Coville said this week about tube usage, “If it’s perceived as torture or inhuman treatment — and it’s the case, it’s painful — then it is prohibited by international law.” At The Daily Beast, Kent Sepkowitz, a doctor, writes, “Without question, [force-feeding] is the most painful procedure doctors routinely inflict on conscious patients,” and calls it “barbaric.”

In 2005, when 142 Guantánamo detainees stopped eating, their subsequent force-feedings caused 263 international doctors to write an open letter in the medical journal The Lancet that denounced the practice and called on doctors to stop participating. They wrote, “Physicians do not have to agree with the prisoner, but they must respect their informed decision.”

To little effect, the American Medical Association condemned the force feedings in 2005, 2009 and again last week, saying that “every competent patient has the right to refuse medical intervention, including life-sustaining interventions.”

Yet most media outlets continue to portray feeding tube use as a “complex ethical debate.” It’s not. Competent prisoners go on hunger strike because they have something to say and no other way to say it. Prison officials choose not to hear — and silence them with tubes. In court documents, wardens cite two primary concerns: the health of the prisoner, whose well-being they are responsible for (and for whose “suicide” they could be blamed); and prison order, including disruption of facility routine, copycat hunger strikers, and low morale among corrections officers and staff.

According to Mara Silver, who wrote about prison hunger strikes for Stanford Law Review in 2005, there is scant evidence that hunger strikers disrupt prison order. In fact, she notes, wardens often aren’t required to show proof when challenged. Consistently, routinely, wardens are deferred to in these cases.

Last week The Chicago Tribune reported that President Obama, who has not yet fulfilled a campaign promise to close Guantánamo, had courts on his side:

Most U.S. judges who have examined forced feeding in prisons have concluded that the measure may violate the rights of inmates to control their own bodies and to privacy — rights rooted in the U.S. Constitution and in common law. But they have found that the needs of operating a prison are more important.

Prisoners’ rights activists have long acknowledged courts’ reluctance to reconsider application of common law and constitutional rights to those inside. This status quo works so long as it is supported by public opinion — or public ignorance of the practice.

Hunger strikes have the power to change public opinion. This might be why the warden of Coleman’s prison has refused my request for a visit — and that of any other journalist. As the warden put it in a brief letter, they think my presence might “exacerbate” the inmate’s condition or “contribute to his detriment.” Or, perhaps, bring attention to Coleman’s case. So long as force-feeding is considered an exceptional practice, applied to less than two dozen men from foreign countries, and on foreign soil, the public and the medical community can remain ignorant of the torture within our growing domestic prison industry.

For an article on William Coleman that appeared in Guernica magazine in January, I spoke with American bioethicist Jacob Appel, who has written extensively about Coleman and feeding-tube usage in U.S. prisons. The public discourse about Guantánamo, Appel told me, had falsely assumed that torture and abuse are an exception rather than the general rule. Guantánamo, he said, “was presented as … an extraordinary set of circumstances, not an outflow of American law.”

----------------------

Ann Neumann is editor of The Revealer, a publication of the Center for Religion and Media at New York University. She has written for Guernica magazine, The Nation and the New York Law Review, and has appeared on Voice of America, NY-1 News and WBAI. She teaches journalism at Drew University. Neumann blogs about religion and dying at otherspoon.blogspot.com. Follow her on Twitter at @otherspoon.[/quote]
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
Mec
Super QFF-er
Super QFF-er
Berichten: 1518
Lid geworden op: vr 17 dec 2010, 19:44

wo 22 mei 2013, 01:26

My Jekyll doesn't Hide
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

wo 22 mei 2013, 13:47

Private Prison Profits Skyrocket, As Executives Assure Investors Of ‘Growing Offender Population’
By Nicole Flatow

May 9, 2013 at 4:30 pm
http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2013/0 ... ?mobile=nc


A major U.S. private prison operator known for inmate abuse, violations, and disregard for the truth reported a 56-percent spike in profit in the first quarter of 2013, due in part to its new strategy for drastically reducing its taxes, the Associated Press reports. During a conference call touting its success, representatives at GEO Group boasted that the company continues to have “solid occupancy rates in mid to high 90s” and that they are optimistic “regarding the outlook for the industry,” in part due to a “growing offender population.” GEO Senior Vice President John Hurley assured investors during the call:

We have a longstanding partnership with the Federal Bureau of Prisons, the United States Marshal Service and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement or ICE. … We continue to see meaningful opportunities for us to partner with all three of these federal agencies, notwithstanding the various issues with the federal budget, which we believe will have no material negative impact on our business. The federal bureau of prisons continues to face capacity constraints coupled with a growing offender population.

The federal prison population has swelled 790 percent since 1980, in large part due to draconian drug and immigration laws. And the United States maintains the title of the world’s number one jailer. Private prison operators nonetheless remain enthusiastic about the prospects of high incarceration rates for business. Representatives on this call shied away from the strong language fellow prison firm Corrections Corporation of America used during its investor call in February, when CEO Damon Hininger assured a strong “continued demand for beds” even after immigration reform. GEO executives explained that they are now taking the position that “discussing our approach and strategies about any particular procurement is really not in the best interest of our company or our shareholders.”

Following a trend of corporations achieving dramatic tax reductions by becoming a real estate investment trust (REIT) – a mechanism historically reserved for firms holding real estate as an investment — both GEO and fellow prison operator Corrections Corporation of America successfully persuaded the Internal Revenue Service recently that they are essentially holding real estate, analogizing prisoners to renters paid for by the government. In reality, the job of running a prison is only nominally about the facility where it’s housed, and primarily about ensuring humane prisoner treatment, inmate rehabilitation, and public safety. But private prison corporations charging “rent” to house prisoners make no more or less money depending on whether they achieve these goals, particularly not when immense political spending to lobby for incarceration and privatization outweighs the public pressure from widely reported abuses at private facilities.
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
dodeca
Super QFF-er
Super QFF-er
Berichten: 1297
Lid geworden op: zo 28 aug 2011, 19:54

wo 22 mei 2013, 13:57

Man met enkelband pleegt meer dan twintig inbraken

http://www.ad.nl/ad/nl/1014/Bizar/artic ... aken.dhtml
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
Mec
Super QFF-er
Super QFF-er
Berichten: 1518
Lid geworden op: vr 17 dec 2010, 19:44

wo 22 mei 2013, 23:45

My Jekyll doesn't Hide
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Gebruikersavatar
combi
Administrator
Administrator
Berichten: 15945
Lid geworden op: za 21 aug 2010, 21:27

do 23 mei 2013, 13:10

www.youtube.com/watch?v=fSwvgXeDh4Y

Ohio valley mall security guard VS people taking pictures

edit:



Security Guard Assaults Photographers Taking Pictures FULL VERSION

Ohio Valley mall security VS people taking pictures
OHIO VALLEY MALL FIGHT CAUGHT ON TAPE: During last week's accident in which a semi-truck plunged into a ravine near the Ohio Valley Mall, a scuffle broke out between a mall security guard and a woman taking photos of the accident. Mall policy states photos can not be taken of mall property. The woman was asked by the security guard to stop when the two fought. WARNING: ADULT CONTENT. No one was charged in the incident. Mall Director of Corporate Communications, Joe Bell, told WTRF on Monday that the fight occurred on mall property and the security guard was doing her job and was explaining to the woman that no pictures were allowed on mall property when the fight broke out.
De volgende gebruiker(s) zeggen bedankt: baphomet
Omhoog
Plaats reactie

Terug naar “Politiek / Oorlog”